PTSD

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that can affect individuals who have experienced or witnessed a traumatic event. This can include natural disasters, accidents, war, sexual assault, or other events that are emotionally or physically harmful. PTSD has been known by many different names in the past, such as “shell shock” and “combat fatigue,” but it is not limited to just military veterans. It can occur in people of any ethnicity, nationality, or culture, and at any age. In the United States, approximately 3.5 percent of adults experience PTSD every year, and the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in adolescents ages 13 -18 is 8%. Women are twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with PTSD.

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF BIPOLAR DISORDER

Signs and Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF BIPOLAR DISORDER

Signs of exposure includes directly experiencing an event, witnessing a traumatic event happening to others, or learning that a traumatic event happened to a close family member or friend. It can also occur because of repeated exposure to horrible details of trauma such as police officers exposed to details of child abuse cases. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health condition that can develop after a person experiences or witnesses a traumatic event.
The symptoms of PTSD can be grouped into four categories that may vary in intensity from person to person. Intrusive, avoidance, alterations in cognition and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity
It’s important to note that PTSD can be effectively treated with therapy, medication, or a combination of both. If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of PTSD, it’s important to seek professional help.

Risk Factors For Developing PTSD

RISK FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING PTSD

While there are no precise risk factors established for PTSD, they can generally be categorized into two parts. The first part is the exposure to trauma(s), which is the first criterion of PTSD. The second factor is not related to exposure to trauma, but personal circumstance, aspects of the trauma, and the post-trauma conditions. In terms of factors that can increase the risk of PTSD due to exposure to trauma, some of the most common ones include living through dangerous events and traumas, getting hurt, seeing another person hurt, witnessing a dead body, or experiencing childhood trauma. Additionally, feeling horror, helplessness, or extreme fear during the traumatic event can also contribute to PTSD. It is important to note that not everyone who experiences trauma will develop PTSD. However, understanding the risk factors can help identify those who may be more susceptible and provide early intervention or support when necessary.

RISK FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING PTSD
HOW IS PTSD DIAGNOSED?

How is PTSD Diagnosed?

HOW IS PTSD DIAGNOSED?

If you have experienced a traumatic event, you may be at risk of developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). To determine if you have PTSD, we will use a brief assessment evaluation consisting of a few questions related to your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors since the trauma. If the initial screening indicates that you may have PTSD, we will conduct a more comprehensive evaluation. The duration of this assessment can range from 15 minutes to 60 minutes, depending on the purpose. During the evaluation, we will ask you questions about your experiences and any challenges you may have faced since the trauma. The assessment may involve a series of questions from a checklist, as well as surveys about your emotions and thoughts. Your provider may also inquire about your physical health and any potential impacts of the trauma on your health. Additionally, your provider may ask your permission to speak with your spouse, partner, or family members to gain a better understanding of your situation. We understand that talking about traumatic events can be difficult. Our goal is to provide you with a safe and supportive environment to help you navigate through this process.

Treatment Plans For PTSD May Include

TREATMENT PLANS FOR PTSD MAY INCLUDE

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can be a debilitating condition to cope with, but there are effective treatment options available. Medication and psychotherapy are two common treatments that can help alleviate symptoms associated with PTSD. Journey Telepsychiatry is an excellent resource for medication management and can prescribe medications for anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions. The team at Journey Telepsychiatry is highly trained and compassionate, offering exceptional psychotherapy to help you overcome the uncomfortable symptoms of PTSD. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is also an excellent type of therapy to treat PTSD. EMDR sessions last up to 60 minutes and typically start with a client rating their level of distress. During the session, our EMDR licensed and trained provider will guide you to shift your thoughts from the traumatic experience to a more comforting one, with the goal of making disturbing memories less immobilizing. It’s important to remember that finding the right treatment option for you is crucial to managing PTSD. To learn more about these treatment options and to find the one that best suits your needs, call, or book an appointment with Journey Telepsychiatry online today.

TREATMENT PLANS FOR PTSD MAY INCLUDE

Treatment Plans For PTSD

ADHD-Medication management
Medication Management

Journey TelePsych offers medication management to alleviate unpleasant symptoms associated with PTSD. They can also prescribe medications for anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions.

Psychotherapy is another powerful tool for managing anxiety
Psychotherapy

The Journey TelePsych team provides exceptional psychotherapy, or talk therapy, to help you overcome uncomfortable PTSD symptoms. To find a PTSD treatment option that best suits your needs, call or book a appointment online today.